The History of an Expedition against Fort DuQuesne in 1755

history of expedition against fort du quesne.jpg
history of expedition against fort du quesne.jpg

The History of an Expedition against Fort DuQuesne in 1755

30.00

It was a sunny July 9, 1755 afternoon as Gen. Braddock watched his 1,400 troops cross the Monongahela River en route to Ft Duquesne to battle the French and Indians: there, to once and for all, chase them from the Forks of The Ohio. Little did Braddock know that by days end, he would lay mortally wounded, almost 1,000 of his men would either be dead or wounded, and the remnants of his once proud army would be in full retreat to Dunbar’s Camp some 40 miles to the rear. Absolutely beautiful book. Originally $74.95 remaining copies priced at $29.95 while supply lasts. Click on book for more info. $AVE $45.00
400 French and Indians, hiding in wait, had laid waste to the once mighty British fighting machine and set into motion the events that would set a continent on fire for the next 8 years. The Braddock expedition and disaster is one of the great mysteries of Colonial America. Was it caused by the poor performance of the British enlisted soldier? Was it caused by British infantry tactics, particularly platoon volley firing, firing at French and Indians hidden behind dense foliage? Was it because of Braddock’s advance position being nearly forty miles ahead of his backup, Colonel Dunbar and 1,000 more men and all the heavy guns? Or was it caused by an arrogant, overbearing, and stubborn General Braddock who refused to listen to practical advise from lowly woodsmen and Indians. The answer to these questions and many more are in this exciting and fact-filled book. No book on the Braddock campaign is equal to this one. Historical references call this book the best account of the Braddock disaster. But not only is this book, by far and away the most factual account, Sargent includes many additional sources of facts about the Braddock campaign that are not found in any other book.So rich in detail is this book that you will read the complete journal of Captain Robert Orme of the Coldstream guard, a right hand man to General Braddock, as well as the journal of Captain Roger Morris, aide de camp with Washington to Gen. Braddock’s campaign. Among the information included in the 6-part appendix is George Croghan’s statement about the Indians with him in the campaign, and his opinion about Braddock’s attitude toward these men and their fate and what might have been in “that day of our unhappy defeat.” Appendix include Braddock’s instructions for his North American campaign by order of the Duke of Cumberland, the French report of the battle and details of Braddock’s last night in London.

Quantity:
Add To Cart